How many people died making the Thai Burma Railway?

The construction of the 420-kilometre railway between Ban Pong in Thailand and Thanbyuzayat in Burma led to the deaths of 2,700 Australians, and more than 12,000 Allied soldiers.

How many Australians died working the Thai Burma Railway?

Relentless labour on inadequate rations in a deadly tropical environment caused huge losses. By the time the railway was completed in October 1943, at least 2,815 Australians, over 11,000 other Allied prisoners, and perhaps 75,000 romusha were dead.

How many people died making the Death Railway?

The workers were maltreated, malnourished and exhausted, and as a result it’s thought that in excess of 100,000 people died during the construction of the railway – showing precisely why it came to be known as the Death Railway.

How many people died building the River Kwai Bridge?

During its construction, approximately 13,000 prisoners of war died and were buried along the railway. An estimated 80,000 to 100,000 civilians also died in the course of the project, chiefly forced labour brought from Malaya and the Dutch East Indies, or conscripted in Siam (Thailand) and Burma.

IT IS INTERESTING:  How long does it take to fly from Australia to Singapore?

Was the Thai Burma Railway completed?

The railway was completed in October 1943. The Japanese were able to use it to supply their troops in Burma despite the repeated destruction of bridges by Allied bombing. More than 90,000 Asian civilians died on the railway, as well as 16,000 POWs, of whom about 2800 were Australian.

Why did the Japanese treat POWs so badly?

Many of the Japanese captors were cruel toward the POWs because they were viewed as contemptible for the very act of surrendering. … Moreover, friendly fire caused about one in four POW deaths as the U.S. attacked Japanese convoys, sinking many ships transporting POWs back to Japan because they were unmarked.

Why was the Thai Burma Railway constructed?

The Burma-Thailand railway (known also as the Thailand-Burma or Burma–Siam railway) was built in 1942–43. Its purpose was to supply the Japanese forces in Burma, bypassing the sea routes which had become vulnerable when Japanese naval strength was reduced in the Battles of the Coral Sea and Midway in May and June 1942.

How long is the Death Railway?

The Burma Railway, also known as the Death Railway, the Siam–Burma Railway, the Thai–Burma Railway and similar names, is a 415 km (258 mi) railway between Ban Pong, Thailand and Thanbyuzayat, Burma, built by the Empire of Japan from 1940–1944 to supply troops and weapons in the Burma campaign of World War II.

How many died at Hellfire Pass?

When the Japanese were not satisfied with the pace of work, prisoners were forced to endure atrocious physical punishment, and some 700 Allied prisoners died or were killed at Hellfire Pass.

IT IS INTERESTING:  What is the highest temperature ever recorded in Cambodia?

What is a prisoner of war called?

Alternative Titles: POW, PW. Prisoner of war (POW), any person captured or interned by a belligerent power during war.

Does the bridge over the River Kwai still exist?

The real bridge on the River Kwai was never destroyed, not even damaged. It still stands on the edge of the Thai jungle about three miles from this peaceful town and it has become something of a tourist attraction. The bridge was erected by Allied pris oners during the Japanese occupation of Thailand in World War II.

Is Bridge over River Kwai a true story?

The film “The Bridge on the River Kwai” dramatized the WWII story of the Thailand-Burma Railway, yet it was largely fictional. Over 65,000 Allied P.O.W.s battled torture, starvation, and disease to hack the 255-mile railway out of harsh jungle for the Japanese.

What happened to the bridge over the River Kok?

Unfortunately, the bridge was then taken down after the filming even though we asked for it to remain in place as it was an excellent facility for the local people. The bridge was not built over the Kok, but over the Fang River which flows into the Kok, for a number of reasons.

Why is it called Death Railway?

Originally called the Thailand-Burma Railway, it earned the nickname “Death Railway” because over one hundred thousand laborers died during its 16 month construction between 1942 and 1943. … Many more died while remaining in the POW camps until 1945.

Who built the railroads in Thailand?

Interest in rail transport in Siam can be traced to when King Rama IV was given a gift of a model railway from Queen Victoria in 1855. The first railway line, 20 km in length, named the Paknam Railway between Bangkok–Samut Prakan began construction in July 1891 under a 50-year concession with a Danish company.

IT IS INTERESTING:  How old is the Philippines today?

Why were the Japanese offended by the 1957 movie The Bridge on the River Kwai?

This bridge was immortalised by Pierre Boulle in his book and the film based on it, The Bridge on the River Kwai. … The Japanese also accused the film’s “glorification of the superiority of Western civilization” because the British in the film were able to build a bridge that the Japanese could not.

Notes from the road